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January 25 2011

christineegger

January 15 2011

christineegger

Wholeness, Understanding, and Development: a bibliography

Hyperlinked version of the bibliography to "Wholeness, Understanding, and Development," updated to reflect URLs current as of 1/15/11. In some cases the link is to a more recent  version than what's being cited here, or to the closest resource possible (for example, a paper is no longer available online but the author has incorporated its content into another publication).

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bold: strongly influences the work I'm doing now

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Aravamudan, Srinivas (1989). “Deconstruction, Soma-significance and the Implicate Order: Or, Can David Bohm and Jacques Derrida Have a Dialogue?” In Paavo Pylkkänen (ed.), The Search for Meaning. London, UK: The Aquarian Press.

Bateson, Gregory and Mary Catherine Bateson (1987). Angels fear: towards an epistemology of the sacred. New York, NY: Macmillan.

Bawden, Richard (1991). “Keynote Address: Systems Thinking and Practice in Agriculture. 85th Annual Meeting, American Dairy Science Association, Raleigh, NC, June 1990.” Journal of Dairy Science 74: 2362-2373.

Beasley, Chris (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. London: Sage Publications.

Beck, Ulrich (1997). The Reinvention of Politics: Rethinking Modernity in the Global Social Order. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, Inc.

Bernstein, Richard J. (1983). Beyond objectivism and relativism: science, hermeneutics, and praxis. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Boettke, Peter J. (2003). “The New Comparative Political Economy.” Prepared for USAID Forum 6: Session on Comparative Political Economy, April 4, 2003, Washington DC.

Bohm, David (1998). On Creativity. Edited by Lee Nichol. London, UK: Routledge.

Bohm, David (1996). On Dialogue. Edited by Lee Nichol. London, UK: Routledge.

Bohm, David (1994). “Soma-Significance: A New Notion of the Relationship Between the Physical and the Mental.” Accessed December 2003 at http://goertzel.org/dynapsyc/1995/bohm.html.

Bohm, David (1980). Wholeness and the implicate order. Boston, MA: Routledge

Bohm, David (1951). Quantum theory. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall.

Bohm, David and Mark Edwards (1991). Changing consciousness: exploring the hidden source of the social, political, and environmental crises facing our world. San Francisco, CA: Harper San Francisco.

Bohm, David and B. J. Hiley (1993). The undivided universe: an ontological interpretation of quantum theory. New York, NY: Routledge.
89 Bohm, David and F. David Peat (2000). Science, order, and creativity. New York, NY: Routledge.

Briggs, John and F. David Peat (1999). Seven Life Lessons of Chaos: Timeless Wisdom from the Science of Change. New York, NY: Harper Collins Publishers.

Briggs, John and F. David Peat (1989). Turbulent Mirror: An Illustrated Guide to Chaos Theory and the Science of Wholeness. New York (NY): Harper & Row.

Capra, Fritjof (1996). The Web of Life: A New Scientific Understanding of Living Systems. New York, NY: Anchor Books.
Capra, Fritjof (1989). Uncommon wisdom: conversations with remarkable people. New York, NY: Bantam Books.

CASID (Center for Advanced Study of International Development). “About CASID.”

Chambers, Robert (1983). Rural development: putting the last first. New York, NY: Longman Scientific and Technical.

Checkland, Peter (1981). Systems Thinking, Systems Practice. New York, NY: John Wiley and Sons.

Dallmayr, Fred (1996). Beyond Orientalism: Essays on Cross-Cultural Encounter. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Das Gupta, Ananda (ed.) (2004). Human Values in Management. Hampshire, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Dennard, Linda (n.d.). "The New Sensibilities of Nonlinear Decision-making."

Denzin, Norman K. and Yvonna L. Lincoln (eds.) (1998). Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Eddy, Mary Baker (2000). Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. Boston, MA: Writings of Mary Baker Eddy.

Escobar, A. (1995). Encountering Development: The Making and Unmaking of the Third World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Feyerabend, Paul (1975). Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge. London, UK: NLB. 90

Fleming, Valerie, Uta Gaidys, and Yvonne Robb (2003). “Hermeneutic research in nursing: developing a Gadamerian-based research method.” Nursing Inquiry 10, no. 2: 113-120.

Fontana, Andrea and James H. Frey (1998). “Interviewing: The Art of Science.” In Denzin, Norman K. and Yvonna S. Lincoln (eds.), Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Foucault, Michel (1997). Society must be defended: lectures at the Collège de France, 1975-76. Edited by Mauro Bertani and Alessandro Fontana; general editors, François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana; translated by David Macey. New York, NY: Picador

Fuller, Robert (2003). Somebodies and Nobodies: Overcoming the Abuse of Rank. Gabriola Island, British Columbia: New Society Publishers.

Gadamer, Hans-Georg (1975). Truth and Method. New York, NY: Seabury Press

Gadamer, Hans-Georg and Lewis Edwin Hahn (1997). The philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer. Chicago, IL: Open Court.

Gasper, Des (2004). The Ethics of Development: from Economism to Human Development. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Gharajedaghi, Jamshid and Russell L. Ackoff (1985). “Toward Systemic Education of Systems Scientists.” Systems Research 2(1): 21-27. In Patton, Michael Quinn (1990). Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods Second Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA:
SAGE Publications, Inc.

Giannoni, Massimo (2004). “Epistemological premise, developmental idea, main motivation in Jung’s and Kohut’s psychoanalysis: looking for some analogies.” The Journal of Analytical Psychology 49, no. 2: 161-175.

Gibbs, Graham R (2002). Qualitative Data Analysis: Explorations with NVivo. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.

Gleick, James (1988). Chaos: Making a New Science. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Goulet, Denis (2000). “Changing development debates under globalization.” Working Paper #276 prepared for the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences Workshop on “Social Dimensions of Globalization,” Vatican City, February 21-22, 1999.

Gustavsson, Bengt (1989). “The nature and understanding of organization from a ‘samhita’ perspective: On the ontology of organization and how to understand it, including the knower, process of knowing, and the known.” Paper to the course “Paradigm, method, and organizational analysis,” University of Stockholm Dept. of
Business Administration. Accessed on September 15, 2004 at
http://www.fek.su.se/Home/gus/PAPERS/Samhitap.htm.91

Haney, David P. (1999). “Aesthetics and Ethics in Gadamer, Levinas, and Romanticism: Problems of Phronesis and Techne.” In PMLA, Vol. 114, No. 1, January 1999: 32-45.

Hanley, Catriona (1998). “Theory and Praxis in Aristotle and Heidegger.” Paper given at the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, August 10-15, 1998, Boston, MA. Accessed on February 1, 2005 at http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Acti/ActiHanl.htm.

Heidegger, Martin (1962). Being and Time. Translated by John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson. London, UK: SCM Press.

Heisenberg, Werner (1962). Physics & Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science. New York, NY: Harper & Row.

Kafatos, Menas and Robert Nadeau (1990). The Conscious Universe: Part and Whole in Modern Physical Theory. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag.

Keen, Steve (2001). Debunking Economics: the naked emperor of the social sciences. New York, NY: Zed Books.

Kidder, Paul (1997). “The hermeneutic and dialective of community in development.” International Journal of Social Economics Vol. 24 No. 11: 1191-1202.

Kojevnikov, Alexei (2002). “David Bohm and collective movement.” Historical Studies in the Physical & Biological Sciences 33, No. 1: 161-192.

Krishnamurti, J. (Jiddu) (1996). The Limits of Thought: Discussions. London, UK: Routledge.

Krishnamurti, J. (Jiddu) and David Bohm (1986). The Future of Humanity: A Conversation. San Francisco, CA: Harper & Row.

Krishnamurti, J. (Jiddu) and David Bohm (1985). The Ending of Time. London, UK: Gollancz.

Kuhn, L. and Robert Woog (2005). “Vortical Postmodern Ethnography: Introducing a Complexity Approach to System Social Theorizing.” Systems Research and Behavioral Science Vol. 22 No. 2 March-April 2005: 139-150.

Latour, Bruno (1999). Pandora’s Hope: Essays on the Reality of Science Studies. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Lavoie, Don (2002). “Main Ideas.” Accessed on March 24, 2005 at
http://psol.gmu.edu/dlavoie.nsf.

Leduma, James D., David L. Cooperrider and Frank J. Barrett (2001). “Appreciative Inquiry: the Power of the Unconditional Positive Question.” In Peter Reason and Hilary Bradbury (eds.), Handbook of Action Research: Participative Inquiry and Practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Madl, Pierre (2004). “Theoretical and Practical Observations from an Ecological Perspective.” Contribution for the Symposium Theory and Reality—Fractures and Bonds (Original German Title: “Theorie und Praxis – Brüche und Brücken”).

Madison, Gary B (1988). The Hermeneutics of Postmodernity. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press.

Martinussen, John (1995). Society, State and Market: A guide to competing theories of development. London: Zed Books.

Nussbaum, Martha C. (2003). “Compassion & Terror.” Doedalus Winter 2003: 10-26.

Nussbaum, Martha C. (2000). Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Patton, Michael Quinn (2002). Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Patton, Michael Quinn (1990). Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods Second Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Peat, F. David (2004a). Course lecture: New Science/New Paradigm, July 6-12, 2004. Pari Center for New Learning, Pari, Italy.

Peat, F. David (2004b). Pari Center brochure. Pari Center for New Learning, Pari, Italy.

Peat, F. David (2002). From Certainty to Uncertainty: The Story of Science and Ideas in the Twentieth Century. Washington DC: Joseph Henry Press.

Peat, F. David (2000). The Blackwinged Night: Creativity in Nature and Mind. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing.

Peat, F. David (1997). Infinite Potential: The Life and Times of David Bohm. Reading, MA: Helix Books.

Peat, F. David (1993). “The Indigenous American-Western Circle.” Kalamazoo, MI: The Fetzer Institute.

Peat, F. David (1989). “Comment on Chaos.” Accessed on June 1, 2004 at http://www.paricenter.com/library/papers/peat03.php.

Peat, F. David (1988). Superstrings and the Search for the Theory of Everything. Chicago, IL: NTC/Contemporary Publishing Group, Inc.

Peat, F. David (1987a). “Interview: David Bohm.” Omni January 1987: 69-74.

Peat, F. David (1987b). Synchronicity: The Bridge Between Matter and Mind. New York, NY: Bantam Books.

Peat, F. David (n.d.a). “Non-Linear Dynamics (Chaos Theory) and its Implications for Policy Planning.” Accessed on June 3, 2004 at
www.fdavidpeat.com/bibliography/essays/chaos.htm.

Peat, F. David (n.d.b). “Gentle Action and Global Solutions.” Accessed on June 1, 2004 at http://www.paricenter.com/library/papers/peat02.php

Peat, F. David (n.d.c). “F. David Peat – Biography.” Accessed on March 3, 2004 at http://www.fdavidpeat.com/biography/biotext.htm..

Potts, Jason. 2000. The New Evolutionary Microeconomics: Complexity, Competence and Adaptive Behavior. Northhampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.

Pylkkänen, Paavo (ed.) (1999). Bohm-Biederman Correspondence: Creativity and Science. London, UK: Routledge.

Pylkkänen, Paavo (n.d.). “Consciousness in David Bohm’s Ontology.” Written for the Consciousness Studies Programme, Department of Humanities, University of Skövde. Accessed March 2005 at http://www.consciousness.arizona.edu/quantum/web5.htm.

Reason, P. and J. Rowan (eds.) (1981). Human Inquiry: A Sourcebook of New Paradigm Research. Chichester, UK: Wiley.

Rorty, Richard (1979). Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Roy, Indrajit (2003). “Development and its Discontents: Civil society as the new lexicon.” In development Volume 46 No 1 March 2003: 80-87.

Ruonavaara, D.L. (2004). “Adaptive to Critical Learning Organization: Participatory Research and the Evolution of a Grassroots Organization in Southern Mexico.” Discussion, unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, 2004, Michigan State University, East Lansing.

Sen, Amartya (1999). Development as Freedom. New York, NY: Anchor Books.

Spivey, Nancy (1997). The constructivist metaphor: reading, writing, and the making of meaning. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2002). “Paul Feyerabend.” Accessed on February 17, 2005 at http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/feyerabend.

Stapp, Henry P. (1993). Mind, Matter, and Quantum Mechanics. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag.

Warren, Carol A.B. (2002). “Qualitative Interviewing.” In Jaber F. Gubrium and James A. Holstein (eds.), Handbook of Interview Research: Context and Method. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Whorf, Benjamin Lee (1956 [1941]). “Language, mind, and reality.” In John B. Carroll (ed.), Language, Thought, and Reality: Selected Writings of Benjamin Lee Whorf. New York, NY: MIT.

Young, T.R. (1991). “Chaos Theory and the Knowledge Process.”

August 09 2010

christineegger

Mark Horvath, aka @HardlyNormal, coming to Detroit September 12-13

Next month, Mark Horvath will come through Detroit as part of an 11,000-mile road trip drawing attention to issues of homelessness and poverty in the U.S. I met Mark online through Beth Kanter's blog and in real life this past April at the Nonprofit Technology conference.

He's legit. A compassionate, articulate, down-to-earth, get-it-done kind of guy.

This is the second time Mark is traveling like this. Here's a clip from his blog post announcing this year's trip:

"The success of last years road trip is too great to measure. Housing programs were started, feeding programs were started, and thousands upon thousands of people who would normally never roll down their car window to talk to a homeless person at an exit ramp now have a new understanding of the realities of life on the streets... This year it’s even more exciting because a camera crew will be following me around making a documentary on homelessness using the road trip as a background... continue reading

In that post, you can see the kind of support Mark's looking for to make the very most of this road trip and documentary. The two types I'm hoping to help him find in particular are media outreach - in Ann Arbor as well as throughout the metro area - and hotel sponsorship - a comfortable place to stay, ideally close to downtown Detroit.

The most recent calendar shows that Mark will be here September 12-13.

If you have resources to offer you can get in touch with Mark directly by commenting on his blog above, but I'm happy to coordinate as well (christine.egger@hotmail.com or 248 787-4917).

Thanks for getting in touch and for taking a closer look at Mark's journey ~

Christine

Christine Egger
http://cdegger.com
http://wiki.socialactions.com
christineegger

July 31 2010

christineegger

http://backupmy.net/twitter/compile/37872.html

A backup of my tweets (Jan-Jul 2010) courtesy of backupmytweets.com. Thanks, David Gurteen for the tip!

April 12 2010

christineegger

"Building online communities without losing your sanity"

February 06 2010

christineegger

Wisdom 2.0 Conference



* What kind of world do we want to live in?
* What's the highest potential for using internet technologies to create that world?

The Wisdom 2.0 Conference embraces both of these questions with equal amounts of passion and attention.

The topics that will be explored at this conference overlap with my interests as a scholar/practitioner of:

* microphilanthropy
* systems and network theories
* the complexity sciences
* Reiki and other mindfulness practices
* the concept of development or betterment

In a word, I would love to be there.

If you see my participation as a win-win for YOU, too, please consider working with me to make that possible...

SHARED INVESTMENTS

The funds collected above will be invested in the cost of an airline ticket from Michigan to San Francisco (about $350 at the moment) and conference registration ($309 if purchased by March 15th). I hope to stay with friends, so no hotel expense, but will provide funds for being in the Bay Area for those two days (say $200): food, local transportation, and the miscellaneous costs that come with being away from home.

In addition to being an INCREDIBLY engaged and active participant at the conference, I'll also make the very most of this opportunity by:

* Leading a session on Gentle Action, building on the webinar described here, either during the conference if possible or as a follow-up event on Sunday

* Co-creating a Network Weaving meetup with others in the area who share an interest in honing this practice

SHARED RETURN

All of this will contribute to a rich, shared "return on investment", including:

* A deeper understanding of all of the ways in which internet technologies can encourage wisdom and mindfulness

* Finding ways for the diverse "communities of practice" coming together for this event to work together

* Open and engaged conversations about all of the above both during and after the event. I'll learn out loud and report back through:
-- tweets during the conference
-- blog posts and comments after the conference
-- any additional calls, emails, etc. you'd like to engage in afterward -- a BlogTalkRadio session is coming to mind, too
-- What else? Let's continue to brainstorm around this together, to realize the very highest potential for what being a part of this event and the surrounding conversations could bring about. Find me at christine@socialactions.com, 248 787-4917, or @CDEgger, or let me know where to find you and I'll meet you there.

*Thank you!*
______________________________________________________

Note ~

As you can see from clicking through the ChipIn button above, funds will pass to me directly. Many of you know me through my role as co-director of Social Actions. Of course, if I'm fortunate enough to plan this trip I'll use plenty of common sense, creating opportunities for the Social Actions community to benefit, too. For example, we've been invited to speak at the Social Enterprise Alliance Summit the day before the Wisdom 2.0 Conference begins, and these funds would allow me to participate in that event. So the ripple effects of this campaign will certainly reach through and overlap with the Social Actions community.

Don't hesitate to ask any questions that help clarify the reasons for this campaign or what we could build together from here :)

December 12 2009

christineegger

Bottled water statistics

Future generations will shake their heads over the way we're consuming bottled water...

Presented by Online Education
The facts about bottled water

September 28 2009

christineegger

Two kinds of feedback

Using this as a placeholder to describe (in more than 140 characters) an illustration contained in an online article/post I read in early August, and can't find again.

The illustration showed two side by side circles representing organizations of any kind.

Around each circle were curved lines. If they'd been over just a small arc, they'd look like eyelashes. But they went all the way around the circle.

The lines around each circle were identical except that they had been made into little arrows. Around one circle the arrows pointed inward. Around the other, the arrows pointed outward.

The illustration was meant to describe two different kinds of feedback: one that reinforced or amplified or otherwise contributed to the organization's shape or content (arrows pointing in); one that reinforced or amplified or otherwise contributed to the context surrounding the organization.

The article itself referenced chaos theory, including F David Peat's work, which is how it caught my attention. I don't think it was published  -- perhaps just a blog post -- but it included citations for its content.

July 29 2009

christineegger

Process of entrepreneurialism: E-Myth inspirations

Britt Bravo recently recommended Michael Gerber's E-Myth books to the Social Actions team (thank you, Britt!). Below are excerpts from the first half of Gerber's E-Myth Mastery that have resonated with me.

Citation for these excerpts:

Gerber, Michael E. 2005. E-Myth Mastery: The Seven Essential Disciplines for Building a World Class Company. New York: Harper Collins.

“Your job is not to become an entrepreneur. It is not to create. It is to study the process of becoming an entrepreneur and then to practice what entrepreneurs do so that entrepreneurship can find you when you’re ready.” P. 4 Reminds me of advice for painters, dancers, writers. The task is to practice the craft.

 

“Went from doing it, doing it as a technician to doing it, doing it as an entrepreneur… Changed from one kind of work to another kind of work.” P 22

 

“The Creator in Sarah came face-to-face with the Producer in Sarah.” P. 26

 

“We probably had made a huge mistake with clients by moving too quickly to what they were concerned about, getting their business to work…. We should have been more resolute in defining what was missing in the client, the entrepreneur, rather than what was missing in the client’s business: the money, the manuals, the systems, better people.” P. 32

 

“’Better’ in your business depends on the depth of your relationship to the fundamental emotional center of entrepreneurial energy. Otherwise, the mechanics, the practice, will consume your energy rather than feed it. The result, and I see it all the time, is a brittle, dry, deadly business. Because an owner who hasn’t found her entrepreneurial passion will never find it trying to create systems and manuals and training programs. Eventually, all that will deplete her energy.” P. 33

 

“I have a choice. I can choose to create simply for the love of it. Or I can turn creation into mechanics and sentence my creativity and passion to death. I can build a business out of some need, or I can create a business free of any need to do it at all.” P. 19 In the book, used metaphor of journaling vs. feeling driven to write a book.

 

“To wrestle with a stranger, to engage in mortal combat, to risk yourself, particularly your beliefs about yourself, an to care more deeply about your relationship with the process than how it all turns out, is what passion is all about.” P. 41

 

“For most people, the conversation about passion inevitably turns to purpose, which is about results, which is about what do I want and what do I get in return for the time and energy and money I’m investing?... I’m about to rain on your parade. And here it is in a proverbial nutshell: There is no purpose to purpose!” p. 45

 

“The question for me is not why this work is important to me, but do I behave like it’s important to me? Do I give my creative focus the time and attention and passion it deserves? Do I take my life seriously, or not?” p. 46

 

“Vision is a reason to live. You can call it purpose, but the minute you turn it into a purpose, it calls forth the part of you that is more focused on results than process.” P. 46

 

“Our job is to [transform] from being a little person with a big purpose, to being a big person with an electrified and electrifying vision. The vision first, the purpose second, the passion in service of [your] aim.” P. 56

 

“The seven essential disciplines to follow are first and foremost about leadership. They are the practices, processes, and perspectives that establish that inextricable connection between entrepreneurship and leadership. Entrepreneurship is the strength to lead. And the disciplines are about the leadership every entrepreneur needs to possess through understanding if his vision is to become a world class reality.” Pp. 68-69.

 

“The leader makes the rhyme of the entrepreneur’s vision and the purpose of the enterprise sound like one thing. He makes them look like a replica of each other, but not exactly one thing. He makes sure that they resonate with each other.” P. 69

 

“The accomplishment of it all is less important than an understanding of the process of it all.” P. 70

 

Discipline: Enterprise Leader

 

“The reluctant entrepreneur is almost always a reluctant leader. Because she is always alone, even when she isn’t, even when she is surrounded by people, clamoring for her attention.” P. 73

 

“Why do it?... godawful fun… it’s either lead or be led… leading is the only way to create the company you want to create.” P. 74

 

Assignment: “Learn to live with the word, accept its importance, and its responsibility. You have to learn to feel at home with “I am a leader. I am called upon to do the work of leadership.” The first assignment is to say that to yourself, over and over again, until it begins to find a comfortable place to rest in you.” P. 74

 

Calls upon the first essential skill of leadership, concentration.

 

“Take in the size of the word and to grow to meet its size, not reduce the word to the size you feel you can fill.” P. 75

 

“What are the most important things to the leader of an enterprise? They are the strategic drivers of the enterprise: the vision, its substance and how it is communicated, with intention, with conviction, with sincerity, and, most of all, with clarity; the business model, the unique way the enterprise works that differentiates it from the rest of the market; the consciousness of the enterprise, how people are regarded, how they are compensated, the core ideas that are important to them and to the enterprise that provide meaning to what they are expected to do every day; and, finally, the end game, what it is, when it is expected to happen, what has to happen between now and then to make sure it does, how much capital is needed to assure its success.” P. 76

 

“Because there are so few [in business] who start out with a clear, long-term vision, most are just reacting to what comes up, confusing their ability to react with their ability to lead…. A leader is someone who can remember what he wants. And what he wants has little to do with what comes up. What comes up is called tactical work from a leadership perspective. What he wants is a strategic question through which a leader evaluates everything that comes up.” P. 77

 

Second assignment: “Begin to develop a brand of clarity… through the practice of discrimination. Every day, I want you to write down what you do. Everything you do…. At the end of every day, I want you to assign a word designation to the items on your list: E for entrepreneur, M for manager, or T for technician.” P. 77

 

“Conscious discrimination is one of the leading indicators of whether you are a practicing leader. Your people will grow to depend on it.” P. 78

 

Second leadership skill: discrimination

 

Third leadership skill: organization.

 

“A leader drives organization in his company, the desire for it, the need for it, the perfection of it, the will to achieve it.” P. 78

 

Third assignment: “Organize your day into strategic and tactical segments… Set aside certain times every day dedicated to entrepreneurial work, management work, and technician work.” P. 78

 

“You will recognize the need for continual improvement in everything you do and everything your business does.” P. 79

 

Fourth essential leadership skill: Innovation

 

Step one: Select aspect of business you wish to improve.

Step two: Determine what the process is for doing it.

Step three: Quantify how effective the process is.

Step four: Rely on your quantification to tell you where you can and need to improve it. Only change one thing at a time so you can perform

Step five: Test it.

Step six: Quantify the results of your test.

Step seven: If positive, orchestrate new process or system.

Repeat in every part of your company.

 

Fourth assignment: “Improve your ability to improve your company by leading the process of improvement, not by improving a process in your company by yourself.” P. 80

 

Fifth essential leadership skill: communication

 

Fifth assignment: “Once you have completed the fourth assignment, and measured the effectiveness of your process improvement, I’d like you to do a review of each and every benchmark of the process…. Look at the scripts you used to communicate what your expectations were of your people, the words you used… where you used scripts and where you didn’t, and the implications of your decisions…. In short, a critical assessment of the effectiveness of your communication… Did you organize the communication of your expectations to your people in a clear, compelling, and inspirational way?” p. 81

 

“Five essential functions for increasing the effectiveness of your communication: inspiration, education, application, implementation, and continual improvement.” P. 81

 

Pages and pages on business plan development

 

Discipline: Marketing Leader

 

“What do we own, what do we do, how do we look, how do we act and feel and perform that differentiates our company from everybody else’s? What’s the defining sensory impact our company makes? That the franchise question. And the key job a marketing leader has is to pursue that question until everyone knows the answer.” P. 116

 

“The marketing leader is accountable for making certain that the hard, objective, concrete, visual, emotional, functional, and financial pieces of the enterprise puzzle come together in an integrated, definable, manageable, measurable, emotionally compelling, and, most important, replicable way.” P. 119

 

“The marketing leader must orchestrate every aspect of the company’s sensory package.” P. 119

 

“The marketing leader knows that the business is his one and only product. And until it can be seen as a picture on the top of a jigsaw puzzle box, literally, it does not exist.” P. 119

 

First assignment: find three companies that have signs of being a marketing leader. Make notes in a notebook about them, organized into the four components if marketing leadership: visual, emotional, functional, and financial.

 

Second assignment: define ‘franchise’ the way a marketing leader would.

 

Third assignment: “Once you’re able to get a clear picture of what a real business looks, acts, and feels like under the direction of a true marketing leader, once you really get what a franchise is and why it’s important… begin to put the pieces of the puzzle together so you can communication your vision or, more exactly, the enterpreneur’s vision, in an absolutely moving way, to the enterprise leader, to the board of directors, to the people who work for you, to the people who will invest in your company, to anyone and everyone who you are determined to influence in a positively dramatic way.” P. 122

 

“You simply make up your mind to do it with as much attention to detail as you can muster. You make up your mind to take it on with everything you have, and everything you don’t have, trusting that you’ll find what you need in the process of committing to it.” P. 124

 

“That’s what this assignment is… To embrace your creative essence…. No holds barred.” P. 125

 

Pages on demographics, markets, customers, their behaviors and purchase decisions, classifying your business, differentiation, positioning strategy (“what emotion am I selling?”)

 

Discipline: Financial Leader

 

“The entrepreneur’s vision is the financial leader’s marching orders.” P. 174

 

“Make sure you’re delegating accountability, rather than abdicating accountability for your money.” P. 191

 

“You can’t pretend things don’t exist when they do.” P. 192

 

“The only way you can know if your financial professionals are providing you with the information you need, if you’re not an expert, is through a system of agreement with you. And it’s the accountability of the financial leader to establish that agreement. It’s the discipline of the financial leader that establishes that agreement, audits its integrity, monitors its reliability, improves its performance continually while, at the same time, increasing the value of the enterprise and driving everyone in the organization to better understand the role money plays in the health of the organization.” P. 192

 

First assignment: For one month, ponder the question (and write about it): what is the meaning of money to you?

 

“I realize how arrogant I’ve been to assume that just because I can imagine my company growing, I will somehow find the money to grow it without doing and being any different.” P. 193 (quoting business owner character in the book)

 

Second assignment: As yourself: “What do I need to know about the financial performance of my company to know how well it’s working?” p. 194

 

Third assignment: After completing the list, organize the items into categories of information, which are essentially functions within your company (operations, marketing. Etc.). “It will help you to discover the organization of your company through the financial indicators that relate to it.” P. 195

 

“Structure, and the perspective it reflects, is critical to the success of your company. Without structure, without an architecture of understanding and a logic tree through which the rationalization of your enterprise is communicated to your people, you will not be able to realize your vision. The organization of money, and the organization of your enterprise, leads to the organization of your organization’s mind around your vision. Despite what many believe, organization and the structure that supports it is the fountainhead for inspiration. Without it, people experience chaos and feel at risk. With it, people have a container within which to be their most creative.” P. 195

 

Pages of financial strategies, financial value, creating cash power (p. 219), accounts receivable

 

Discipline: Management Leader

 

“The absence of management leadership means that businesses become defined by the expectations of their people rather than the other way around.” P. 238

 

“The management mind-set… can either feed the unconscious norm of our ordinary thinking and expectations in a way that repeats the past experiences of the people who work there, or … tussle with the ordinary… in a way that sets a new standard for experience, for results, and for benchmarks.” P. 238

 

“If our future most often reflects our past and the company we have today is a product of our past, which is anything but world class, how do we break free of our past and create a different future than the one our current reality would dictate?... This is the big question the management leader must ask.” P. 239

 

“The solution lies in how we view the relationship between true creativity and stunning orchestration…. What if we could hold creativity and orchestration as one, unified principle?” p. 241

 

First assignment: What is it about Social Actions that, if given the opportunity to create a clean slate, you’d still want to retain? Any sacred cows you’re unwilling to give up whether they support the creation of World Class Company or not? And are you simply improving an old company, or are you creating a new company?

 

“The management leader is responsible for what his people focus their attention on and how…. Focusing their attention on the most important things… living on the edge between the future and the best of the past…. Add orchestration to the mix… the perfect balance between structure… and substance.” Pp. 246-247

 

Second assignment: Make a list of responsibilities for each role in the organization.

 

Third assignment: List, in order of importance, the five tasks that must be done by the person fulfilling each role every day, day in and day out. Tasks that managers do.

 

Half of this section, and these disciplines, not yet included here:

Client Fulfillment

Lead Conversion

Lead Generation

 

June 30 2009

christineegger

Gadamer's concept of play

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Time for another excerpt from my thesis, this time on Hans-George Gadamer's concept of play. Starts with a bit of Richard J. Bernstein to set the context.

Citation for excerpt:

Egger, Christine D. (2005). “Wholeness, Understanding, and Development: An Episystemic Inquiry.” M.A. thesis, 2005, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.

Please see the entire thesis here for citations to referenced materials:

http://goodallaround.files.wordpress.com/2008/01/egger-christine-thesis-wholeness-understanding-development.pdf

______________________________________________________

Bernstein further suggests that the need for any standards at all is driven by the incommensurability of conflicting theories. <!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[i]<!--[endif]--> My interpretation of this is that an understanding of any theory actually requires that there be a variety of conflicting theories to consider. This seemed counter-intuitive to me until he drew from the work of philosopher Paul Feyerabend. Attempting to understand a culture different from one’s own, Feyerabend suggests, is a process of deciding whether the other culture’s

…way of thinking can be reproduced in European terms… or whether it has a ‘logic’ of its own, not found in any Western language. In the course of the comparison the anthropologist may rephrase certain native ideas in English. This does not mean that English as spoken independently of the comparison is commensurable with the native idiom. It means that languages can be bent in many directions and that understanding does not depend on any particular set of rules. (Feyerabend in Bernstein, 1983: 250-251)

I interpret Feyerabend to be suggesting that English by itself is incommensurable with the native language by itself. However, the application of those two languages as a means to understand the other brings an improved understanding of the other culture.<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[ii]<!--[endif]-->

According to Bernstein, Feyerabend’s example draws attention to three features of understanding across an incommensurable divide: first, that the incommensurability of paradigms, forms of life, and traditions demands an “openness of understanding and communication” (Bernstein, 1983: 92); secondly, that this openness allows for an understanding of what is distinctive about others in a way that appreciates the limitations of their perspective; and, third, that this process of comparison and contrast results in a better understanding of others, but also of ourselves. Incommensurability, in other words, “does not get in the way of understanding and comparing the concepts—it rather sets a challenge to us of finding out how to understand and compare them” (Bernstein, 1983: 96). Looking back at Bohm’s and Peat’s theses from this perspective, I can see a similarity. Peat, for example, writes that “from the chaos perspective, individual differences actually form the basis [for] resolution” (in footnote, Briggs and Peat, 1999: 161).

Bernstein then draws from Hans-Georg Gadamer to describe understanding as a process that moves beyond the dichotomy of objectivism<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[iii]<!--[endif]--> and relativism.<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[iv]<!--[endif]--> Bernstein emphasizes that he is not concerned with taking one side or the other of this dichotomy, or with assessing its strengths and weaknesses. Rather, he views it as “misleading and distortive” (Bernstein, 1983: 19), and draws from Gadamer to describe an ontological perspective that contrasts significantly with Cartesianism. Bernstein describes Gadamer’s concept of

… a distinctive ‘mode of being’ of play [in which] the players are not the subjects of play; instead play merely reaches presentation through the players’ (Truth and Method, p. 92). [In this mode] play is not even to be understood as a kind of activity; the actual subset of play is not the individual, who among other activities plays, but instead the play itself. (Bernstein, 1983: 121)

This concept of play, Gadamer suggests, illustrates a “to-and-fro movement, a type of participation characteristic of our involvement with works of art” (Bernstein, 1983: 122) or any entity that from a Cartesian perspective is seen as separate from the “subject.” According to Bernstein,

… this play between the ‘things themselves’ and our prejudgments helps us comprehend why ‘understanding must be conceived as part of the process of the coming into being of meaning.’ Meaning is always coming into being through the ‘happening’ of understanding. (Bernstein (1983: 139)

Bernstein suggests that this concept serves to illustrate

…what is wrong with that way of thinking that dichotomizes the world into ‘objects’ which exist an Sich and ‘subjects’ that are detached from and stand over against them. We do not comprehend what the things themselves ‘say’ unless we realize that their meaning transcends them and comes into being through the happening or event of understanding” (p. 337). Through this ‘happening’, Gadamer writes, “the significance of all statements—those of art and those of everything else that has been transmitted—is formed and made complete. (Bernstein, 1983: 125)

The point that Gadamer is making, Bernstein suggests, is that

understanding, interpretation, and application (or appropriation) are not three independent activities to be relegated to three different subdisciplines but rather are… all moments of the single process of understanding. (Bernstein, 1983: 145)

In this way, Gadamer negates the Cartesian claim that the subject acquires an understanding of the object through a distanced build-up of knowledge gained through the application of reason. Understanding for Gadamer, rather, is not arrived at through the search for an Archimedean point separate from ourselves; or is understanding limited to only that which we can “know” internally. Rather, it is the very stuff of engagement, between what is perceived as internal and what is perceived as external.

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This seemed to me to reinforce and build upon Bohm and Peat’s descriptions of understanding, and it helped me to make sense of Bohm’s concept of soma-significance. Bernstein’s description of Gadamer seemed to me to resemble Bohm’s perspective in which reality, knowledge, and process are united in a single movement; concepts arise acausally from that process. Gadamer’s concept of play was also, for me, an important validation of Bohm’s rheomode experiment. And while Peat does not reference Gadamer directly in his writing, he uses language similar to Gadamer’s, for example, in describing the act of understanding a work of art or text as “merging horizons” with that work (Peat, 2000).

<!--[if !supportEndnotes]-->

<!--[endif]-->

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[i]<!--[endif]--> Bernstein then traces the history of the thesis of incommensurability from Kuhn who, he wrote, first questioned the belief that commensuration was the basis for distinguishing rationality from irrationality; and to Feyerabend, who extended Kuhn’s thesis from the natural sciences to the social sciences.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[ii]<!--[endif]--> I was interested to discover later that Bohm had been a “significant influence” on Feyerabend (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2002). According to Peat (1997), Feyerabend and Bohm became close while both were at the University of Bristol, and Feyerabend’s interest in physics and philosophy made life more tolerable for Bohm there. Feyerabend apparently found Bohm’s discussions intense: Feyerabend told Peat that on one occasion, “Bohm called at Feyerabend’s home, walked into the living room, and took off his raincoat, all the while enthusiastically discussing philosophy, only to find that Feyerabend was not home!” (Peat, 1997: 187-188)


<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[iii]<!--[endif]--> By objectivism, Bernstein (1983: 8) means “the basic conviction that there is or must be some permanent, ahistorical matrix or framework to which we can ultimately appeal in determining the nature of rationality, knowledge, truth, reality, goodness, or rightness.”


<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[iv]<!--[endif]--> By relativism, Bernstein (ibid.) means “the basic conviction that [concepts of rationality, truth, reality, right, the good, or norms] must be understood as relative to a specific conceptual scheme, theoretical framework, paradigm, form of life, society, or culture.”

 

February 01 2009

christineegger

Bohm's rheomode (language) experiment

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An excerpt from my Master’s thesis, detailing quantum physicist David Bohm’s rheomode language experiment.

Citation for excerpt:

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Egger, Christine D. (2005). “Wholeness, Understanding, and Development: An Episystemic Inquiry.” M.A. thesis, 2005, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.

________________________________

 

Bohm believed that the English language could be made conducive to discussions of quantum theory—and therefore to discussions of the inter-relatedness of reality, knowledge, and experience. Hoping to show the potential for such a re-structuring, he developed a variation of English that he called the rheomode (taking ‘rheo’ from a Greek verb meaning ‘to flow’). He devotes nearly twenty pages in Wholeness to presenting a detailed “rheomode treatment” of several verbs and nouns.(1) In each case, the word “ceases to be taken as an ‘indivisible atom of meaning’ and instead [is] seen as no more than a convenient marker in the whole movement of language” (emphasis added; Bohm, 1980: 52). Bohm suggests that, in regular English, the verb “implies that all action arises in a separate subject, and acts either on a separate object, or else reflexively on itself” (Bohm, 1980: xiv). In the rheomode, by contrast, the verb signifies an act of perceiving the undivided process and content of that to which attention is being drawn. In other words, the verb structure is such that process (the thinker and the thinking that is going on) and content (that which is being thought about) cannot be separated. Similarly, rheomode nouns “signify not separate objects but, rather, continuing states of activity of the particular form indicated by the verbs” (Bohm, 1980: 45).

Years after Bohm developed the rheomode, Peat organized a series of meetings between Western scientists and Native Americans.(2) Bohm participated, and he was thrilled to learn of the similarities between the structure of the Blackfoot language and the structure of the rheomode (Peat, 2004a).

Peat described this meeting during the course in Pari. He provided an example from the Naskapi language, a member of the Blackfoot language family, that I think clarifies just what Bohm was describing with the rheomode. A particular Naskapi word, he said, translates as “the sorcerer heals the sick man,” even though the root of the word would translate as “singing going on” and the modifiers would translate as men and healing. Peat suggests that the entire state of activity included in the Naskapi word—the singing and the men and the healing all together—is obscured in the English translation.

On the subject of thought, Bohm suggests that “the content of thought and the process of thinking… are not two separately existent things [but rather are] two aspects of views of one whole movement” (Bohm, 1980: 23). He suggests that to divide things up in our thinking is itself a way of thinking about things that has an accurate, albeit limited, domain. To tie this to the earlier discussion on underlying wholeness, this domain would be the explicate (or unfolded) order of abstractions. From Bohm’s perspective, exclusive or primary attention to the abstractions is appropriate in the domain of technical activities where “the thing with which we are dealing is not significantly affected by our thought about it” (Bohm and Edwards, 1991: 138). But when the thing is significantly affected by our thought, he suggests, then we have moved into a domain in which exclusive or primary attention to that thing is no longer appropriate: in those cases we mistake “the content of our thought for a ‘description of the world as it is’” (Bohm, 1980: 4). In the language of the earlier discussion on reality and knowledge, he is suggesting that this limits our view of reality to what is known rather than what is known, unknown, and unknowable (i.e., ‘beyond thought’).

To give exclusive attention to what we are thinking about, Bohm and Peat suggest, obscures the impact that the process of thinking has on our thoughts. What is needed, Bohm writes, is a “kind of attention that is subtle enough to see how thought is working” (Bohm and Edwards, 1991: 141). This kind of attention would itself be understood as a movement “which is involved in all our sensory perceptions, and in the act of understanding the whole of perception and thought” (Bohm, 1998: 79). This would be realized, Bohm suggests, not through an

… explanation that would give us some knowledge of the relationship of thought and thing, or of thought and ‘reality as a whole’ [but rather through an] act of understanding; in which we see the totality as an actual process that [incorporates] both thought and what is thought about in a single movement. (Bohm, 1980: 1970)

Briggs and Peat echo this message in their discussion of chaos theory as well. The linear nature of thought, they propose, no matter how insightful, “can take us only so far. To live sanely and deeply we need something else, a special sort of awareness” (Briggs and Peat, 1999: 175).

___________________________

 (1) Bohm offers this example: “Let us consider the Latin verb ‘videre’, meaning ‘to see’…. We then introduce the root verbal form ‘to vidate’. This does mean merely ‘to see’ in the visual sense,’ but we shall take it to refer to every aspect of perception including even the act of understanding, which is the apprehension of a totality, that includes sense perception, intellect, feeling, etc. (e.g., in the common language ‘to understand’ and ‘to see’ may be used interchangeably). So the verb ‘to vidate’ will call attention to a spontaneous and unrestricted act of perception of any sort whatsoever, including perception of whether what is seen fits or does not fit ‘what is’, as well as perception even of the very attention-calling function of the word itself. Thus… there is no division between the content (meaning) of this word and the total function to which it gives rise.” (Bohm, 1980: 47)


<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->

(2)These meetings took place at the Fetzer Institute in Kalamazoo, Michigan. For a summary, see (Peat, 1993).

___________________________

 

Bohm, David (1980). Wholeness and the implicate order. Boston, MA: Routledge

 

Peat, F. David (2004a). Course lecture: New Science/New Paradigm, July 6-12, 2004. Pari Center for New Learning, Pari, Italy.

 

Bohm, David and Mark Edwards (1991). Changing consciousness: exploring the hidden source of the social, political, and environmental crises facing our world. San

Francisco, CA: Harper San Francisco.

 

Bohm, David (1998). On Creativity. Edited by Lee Nichol. London, UK: Routledge.

 

Briggs, John and F. David Peat (1999). Seven Life Lessons of Chaos: Timeless Wisdom from the Science of Change. New York, NY: Harper Collins Publishers.

December 31 2008

christineegger

Characteristics of "Gentle Action"

Theoretical physicist F David Peat has written a wonderful book titled "Gentle Action."

Peat suggests that gentle action is a "kind of minimal but highly intelligent activity that arises out of the very nature of the system under investigation" (Gentle Action, p. 137). He proposes this concept as an alternative to Newtonian or mechanistic metaphors for action.

I have so much more to write about this topic in the future, but at the moment I'm using this Soup entry to simply document a list of characteristics that would help us identify an action as "gentle" in the way that Peat describes.

These characteristics are paraphrasings of a bullet list in the book's 7th chapter:

 

  • Evidence of an explicit dance forward into the “do-able” parts of a problem and then back to take into account the overall context and meaning of the much wider issue, on both the individual and organizational level.
  • Evidence that the “output emphasis” is on “good questions” rather than answers
  • Evidence that participants are taking personal responsibility for what is going on.
  • Evidence of trust
  • Evidence of earth stewardship
  • Evidence that participants are able to express their individuality
  • Evidence that the experiences and advice of elders is honored
  • Evidence that the ethical and moral dimensions of the decisions being made, and actions being taken, are carefully considered
  • Evidence of inclusive opportunities for empowerment
  • Evidence that family and community connections are being highly valued
  • Context that actively encourages broad ripple effects of even the tiniest of actions
  • Evidence of a sense of obligation to the rest of the world and a responsibility to the future
  • Evidence that participants value their local and global citizenship
  • Evidence that artists’ participation is encouraged and celebrated

For more info and to order a copy:

http://www.paripublishing.com/books/gentleaction/

Peat, F. David. Gentle Action (2008). Pari, Italy: Pari Publishing.

Disclosure: I've been a colleague of David's since attending a workshop of his in Pari in 2004. My thoughts on the potential for microphilanthropy to exemplify "gentle action" are included in the book.

December 05 2008

christineegger

Social Actions: $20,009 for 2009!

If you know me, you know I'm a card-carrying fan of Social Actions and one of their full-time team members.

Social Actions has just launched a campaign to collect $20,009 for 2009, and over the next several weeks I'll be writing to EVERYONE I know asking for their support.

If you know me and haven't already received an email, it's just a matter of time! :)

So I'm sharing my note here, in case you want to read it now, make a donation, and conserve email-traffic energy.

Thanks all, for considering my sincere request:

**************************************************************

Hello!

I’m writing to ask for your help in supporting Social Actions’ campaign to collect $20,009 for 2009.

http://www.socialactions.com/2009-fundraiser

Each dollar we collect will go directly to expanding the scope and size of our database of actions, creating new ways to share actions, and developing the Social Actions API that brings all of those actions together.

More specifically, as Peter recently blogged, we’ve set 9 goals for Social Actions to achieve in 2009. Each is ambitious, absolutely attainable, and inspires me to work as hard as I can daily to see them realized:

* Collecting actions from at least 100 sources and distributing them across 1000 domains in at least 3 languages;
* Advocating opensource methods for tracking impact;
* Educating on best practices and trends;
* Developing open standards for describing online actions in appropriately nuanced detail, so people can quickly find the ones that are most relevant to them;
* And much, much more.

To meet the financial needs associated with this work going forward, we’re pursuing foundation grants, event sponsorships, consulting services, and other income-generating ideas.

This campaign is timed to provide funds as those income-sources come together, but the invitation to contribute financially to Social Actions is also beautifully consistent with Social Actions’ mission and commitment to open, inclusive, peer-to-peer philanthropy.

I absolutely love the image of Social Actions’ work being held up – made possible – by thousands of individuals and organizations who find value in what we’re doing.

If you’d like to be a part of what we’re building in this way, please make a donation in whatever amount is right for you. There’s a convenient online donation widget on our site (of course!) with a list of $20.09+ contributors and their reasons for giving:

http://www.socialactions.com/2009-fundraiser

Thank you for considering my request and thank you, too, for all of the support you bring to Social Actions!

Christine

Christine Egger
Partner Relations, Lead Platform Liaison
Social Actions http://www.SocialActions.com
Join the conversation: http://blog.socialactions.com
248 787-4917

December 04 2008

christineegger

TakingITGlobal's Youth Media Exchange

I had a chance to meet yesterday with TakingITGlobal's co-founder Michael Furdyk and IT guru Nick Yeo. TakingITGlobal  is a group that understands how to Inspire, Inform, and Involve today's young people in being the change they wish to see in the world.

An example of the kinds of programs they create for their 200,000 members around the world, described in their own words:


Youth Media Exchange is a collaborative project created by TakingITGlobal and Global Kids, in association with Asia Society. It is an online social network for youth interested in using digital media tools to share information on major global issues.

Our vision is to create a space where youth:

* link to, embed, or generate the content that inspires them and discuss the global issues that are most important to them.

* reflect on their abilities to create and examine media and use ymex.org and the linked resource as an inspiration and a platform for experimentation to try new tools and improve their skills.

* expand their network of contacts and collaborators outside of their communities and their region of the world to have cross-cultural communication.

* have a blast learning, experimenting, creating, and communicating!
christineegger

Recycling your aluminum can: is it really that important?

A few months ago, I was talking with a few friends when the topic of recycling came up. I stressed the importance of recycling aluminum, because I'd seen a film a few years ago about how harmful bauxite mining is to the environment and people living near a bauxite mine (bauxite is a key "ingredient" in aluminum).

I kept thinking about our conversation, and how even though I felt sure that recycling aluminum was a good idea, I didn't really remember much about why and how aluminum was made and WHY recycling made so much sense.

So I spent a few hours researching the topic and this is what I discovered.

Spoiler: recycling aluminum makes ALOT of sense!

_____________________________________________________________

A quick introduction

Aluminum oxide is extracted from bauxite, a rock that’s just under the surface so the way it’s extracted is through strip mining. The environmental damage comes primarily from that strip mining and the sludge (called "red mud") that's left over (its put into big shallow landfills, which destroys whatever is under it and it takes years before it supports any new vegetation; photos at http://www.geocities.com/watercaribbean/dsc02651.jpg.)
 
The good news is that aluminum is INCREDIBLY recyclable -- there's technically no reason to ever mine any more bauxite.


_____________________________________________________________

A quick summary of where aluminum comes from
Source: http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Aluminum.html

Aluminum compounds occur in all types of clay, but the ore that is most useful for producing pure aluminum is bauxite. Bauxite consists of 45-60% aluminum oxide, along with various impurities such as sand, iron, and other metals. Although some bauxite deposits are hard rock, most consist of relatively soft dirt that is easily dug from open-pit mines. Australia produces more than one-third of the world's supply of bauxite. It takes about 4 lb (2 kg) of bauxite to produce 1 lb (0.5 kg) of aluminum metal.

_____________________________________________________________

The impact of mining bauxite on the environment and people’s way of life

The people who live in and around a bauxite mining site typically resist the mine coming into their area, and they lose their livelihood and way of life when the mine comes in despite that resistance. The mines are typically placed 1) where politicians can most easily dismiss the wishes of the people who don't want one nearby and 2) where politicians are most likely to benefit from financial deals with mining corporations.

Some media attention to the impact of mining bauxite on the environment and people's lives:

In Jamaica: http://www.american.edu/TED/bauxite.htm

In India: http://www.freewebs.com/epgorissa/, http://www.indiaresource.org/issues/globalization/2004/sterlite.html, http://www.minesandcommunities.org/Action/press668.htm

In Brazil: http://www.unctad.org/en/docs/pocomd49.en.pdf

Worldwide: http://internationalrivers.org/en/climate-change/aluminum-cans-dirty-little-secret
_____________________________________________________________

Why You Need to Recycle That Can
source: http://www.professorshouse.com/your-home/environmentally-friendly/recycling-aluminum-cans.aspx
 
"Aluminum is everywhere. We see it in soft drink cans, beer cans, pie plates, foil, packaging, siding, gutters, and more. What most people don’t realize is that aluminum is practically the perfect recyclable material. Out of the most common recyclable materials that clutter up our landfills—glass, paper, metals, cardboard, plastics—aluminum is the only material that’s endlessly recyclable, 100% recyclable, and that pays for itself. Here are some other interesting facts we bet you don’t know about aluminum recycling:

· It takes energy to make aluminum from scratch. The energy you save by recycling a single aluminum can will run a TV for three hours.

· In fact, it takes 95% less energy to recycle old aluminum into new than to make aluminum from bauxite ore.

· It takes about 400 years for aluminum to break down naturally. That Coke can you just drank from will probably still look about the same in another century or two.

· Approximately 350,000 aluminum cans are made every minute.

· Aluminum can be recycled over and over without breaking down. In theory, we have an inexhaustible supply of it in circulation right now. If we recycled all our aluminum, we’d never have to make more.

· The aluminum in one single soda can is worth about a cent. Americans threw away millions of cans last year. The American government could pay off a significant portion of its debt with a few years’ worth of aluminum cans.

· The aluminum Americans throw away each year is enough to provide the auto industry with all the raw material it needs to build a year’s worth of new cars.

· With all the industries that use aluminum—in manufacturing, in packaging, in cars and airplanes—the industry that uses the most aluminum is the beverage industry.

· In 2004, Americans recycled enough aluminum to build thirteen aircraft carriers.

· Every three months, Americans discard enough aluminum to completely rebuild every single commercial airplane in America.

· Because our landfills are so full of aluminum cans, some landfills incinerate extra aluminum. This isn’t just a huge waste; it also pours toxic metals and gases into the atmosphere.

· The average American discarded fourteen and a half pounds of aluminum just from packaging last year—and almost three pounds of aluminum foil. That’s not even counting aluminum cans.

· Most people don’t realize how strong a metal aluminum is. Four six packs can support the weight of a 4,000-lb. aluminum car.

· Aluminum has a phenomenally high melting point—1,220ºF, to be exact.

· A long time ago, aluminum was a much more valuable metal than gold or silver.

· Four pounds of raw bauxite ore is saved for every pound of aluminum that is reclaimed in the recycling process.

· Aluminum is valuable. It’s still very much in demand, and recycled aluminum is just as useful and desirable as new. In fact, aluminum is the only recyclable material that depots can recoup their recycling costs with.

· Making aluminum from bauxite ore is a dirty process—and burning it is even worse. By doubling our aluminum recycling rate, we could cut a million tons of pollutants per year out of the atmosphere.

· Recycling aluminum isn’t just about collecting cans. You can also recycle old siding, aluminum foil, and even the gutters on your roof. Most recycling depots that take cans will also take these materials.

· Every part of the can is reusable—you don’t have to prepare it in any way, other than to rinse it out.

· In 1996, aluminum manufacturers saved enough energy by recycling aluminum instead of creating it from bauxite ore to power a city the size of Pittsburgh for six years or so.

· Aluminum recycles in no time at all. When you send a can to a recycling depot, it’s processed, recycled, and back on the shelf again in about a month."

"There’s no downside to recycling aluminum: it’s fast, it pays for itself, and it’s great for the environment. So next time you get ready to throw out that aluminum foil you wrapped your sandwich in at work or at school, think again—that aluminum could be back on the shelf in a month, save enough energy to run a big appliance like a TV for three hours or so, and pay for its own recycling costs in the process. Recycle it instead of throwing it out, and you’ll be doing the world some good."

_____________________________________________________________


:cde

November 23 2008

christineegger

Myers-Briggs = insight

I'm an ENFP (formerly ESFP, working towards ENFJ).

http://www.personalitypage.com/ENFP.html

What are you?

November 19 2008

christineegger

Testing testing 123

I've just created a soup... hat tip to Lucy Bernholz of Philanthropy 2173 for tweet-inquiring the value of this site, and to Tom Watson for creating a Soup of his own for inspiration (http://tomwatson.soup.io). Will see what it lets me do...
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